Micrit Monastrell 2017

Micrit Monastrell 2017
€27.90
€167.40
OR

Information

ELABORATION
Micrit Monastrell 2017
is made with Monastrell from Jumilla that comes from a vineyard of about 80 years planted on a staggered loam (planting in parallel rows) and in dry land. The soils are sandy loam and covered with gravel. The vatting was done in underground stone presses with part of whole clusters. The refining lasted 17 months in 500-litre neutral French oak barrels and was bottled in March 2019 without filtering.
Micrit is the name given to the fine particles formed by the erosion of carbonate limestone rocks. These limestone rocks come from the detachment of the bedrock found in the mountains that surround the vineyard. Its erosion corresponds to mechanical effects (soil tillage), atmospheric (wind and rain) or physical (due to weathering). This degradation of limestone forms the soil where takes root this vineyard in which Micrit 2017 is born.

TASTING NOTES (Published in El Club April 2020)
Micrit Monastrell 2017
has an intense, very bright and deep garnet colour. On the nose, powerful notes of black fruits appear at the right point of ripeness, reminiscent of gooseberries, cherries and blueberries, and which are combined with aromas of Mediterranean herbs and spices such as rosemary, dried bay leaf or black pepper and cloves. On the palate it is voluminous, with a silky texture that runs through the palate and is made up of soft and abundant tannins, which give a good structure to the whole, as well as good ageing potential. Fresh and tasty, it has lingering final notes of black liquorice, hints of toasted wood and juicy black fruit. A balanced and full-bodied red wine, perfect to accompany large dishes of red meat, baked lamb, small game or a table of cured sheep and cow cheeses. To be enjoyed from now on and for the next 7 years served between 14 and 16ºC in a Cabernet / Merlot glass from the Riedel Vinum series (6416/0) or in the Syrah from the Riedel Vinum series (6416/30).

Micrit 2017 is a new vision of the monastrell”, affirms José María Vicente.